“Transmissions” at Cedarhurst Center for the Arts

Transmissions
Cedar Hurst Center for Arts
February 20th – May 1st 2016

http://www.cedarhurst.org/BeckFamilyCenterGallery.html

 

“Transmissions” is an exhibition of work by Chicago based artist and educator Tom Burtonwood. Burtonwood is an Assistant Professor at the School of the Art Institute of Chicago and has been working in the 3D printing sphere since 2011. His work explores the production, transmission, dissemination and reception of cultural works as experienced through the lens of digital forms of fabrication.

In addition to exhibiting a number of Burtonwood’s works “Transmissions” includes projects by three people from the “Maker” community, Laura Taalman, Frankie Flood and Aswin Krishnamoorthy, to highlight some of the more utilitarian projects that people have produced via 3D printing. Laura Taalman is a Professor of Mathematics at James Madison University and an “expert amateur” in the field of 3D printing. “Transmissions” will feature a number of Taalman’s mathematically inspired 3D models, algorithmically-generated designs, and Minecraft experiments. Frankie Flood is an Associate Professor at the University of Wisconsin in Milwaukee. Flood is a key member of the e-NABLE Community, a group of individuals from all over the world who are using their 3D printers to create free 3D printed hands and arms for those in need of upper limb assistive devices. “Transmissions” will include a number of these upper limb assistive devices. Aswin Krishnamoorthy is a Radiologist at Swedish Covenant Hospital in Chicago. Krishnamoorthy has been working with CT scans from ancient Egyptian mummies to 3D print artifacts and anatomical pieces from these important archeological finds. While the real mummies are hidden forever 3D printing and scanning allows us to see and touch these pieces for the first time. “Transmissions” will feature a number of pieces printed by Krishnamoorthy.

Additionally members of the public will be able to see 3D printing first hand on an Ultimaker Go specially installed for the exhibition and printing a number of works from the exhibition.